Asian Journal of Transfusion Science
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 99-105

Transfusion-transmitted infections, its risk factors and impact on quality of life: An epidemiological study among β-thalassemia major children


1 Department of Community Medicine and Family Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India
2 Department of Public Health Administration, All India Institute of Hygiene and Public Health, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
3 Department of Pathology, Calcutta National Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
4 Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, All India Institute of Hygiene and Public Health, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
5 Department of Community Medicine, R. G. Kar Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Bijit Biswas
Department of Community Medicine and Family Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Basni Industrial Area, Phase-2, Jodhpur - 342 005, Rajasthan
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ajts.AJTS_74_18

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BACKGROUND: Multi-transfused thalassemic children are at higher risk of acquiring transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs). There are limited data available on TTIs among thalassemic children, especially on its impact on their quality of life (QoL). AIM: The aim of this study is to find out the proportion of multi-transfused β-thalassemia major (β-TM) children suffering from TTIs, its risk factors and impact on QoL. METHODS: This was a hospital-based, analytical observational study, cross-sectional in design, conducted among 328 β-TM children and their caregivers attending thalassemia day care unit of a medical college during May 2015–April 2016, with a structured schedule. Data were analyzed with appropriate statistical methods using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. RESULTS: Two-fifth (39.9%) of them were found to have TTIs with hepatitis C being the most common (34.5%), followed by hepatitis B (4.5%) and human immunodeficiency virus (1.8%). In the multivariable model, place of residence (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] – 2.23 [1.19–4.17]), per capita monthly family income (AOR – 1.84 [1.10–3.07]), and blood transfusion frequency (AOR – 1.19 [1.10–1.29]) were significant predictors of TTIs adjusted with their age, age at diagnosis, last pretransfusional hemoglobin level, size of spleen, and caregivers knowledge regarding the disease. The study participants with TTIs had a lower QoL compared to others as there were significant differences in between the total QoL scores ([49.9 ± 15.6 vs. 57.4 ± 15.5], P ≤ 0.001) and its various domains. CONCLUSION: There was high burden of TTIs among multi-transfused β-TM children and it has significant negative impact on their quality of lives.


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2006 - Asian Journal of Transfusion Science | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
Online since 10th November, 2006