Asian Journal of Transfusion Science
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
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RHCE*E and RHCE*e genotype incompatibility in a southern Thai Muslim population


1 Graduate Program in Medical Technology, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand
2 Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand
3 Regional Blood Centre 12th, Thai Red Cross Society, Songkhla, Thailand

Correspondence Address:
Oytip Nathalang,
Graduate Program in Medical Technology, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Thammasat University, 99 Moo 18 Klongluang, Pathum Thani 12120
Thailand
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/ajts.AJTS_10_20

CONTEXT: The formation of red cell alloantibodies resulting from both transfusion and pregnancy can cause adverse effects from allogeneic blood transfusions. Alloanti-E is commonly detected among Thai and Asian populations. AIMS: This study aimed to determine RHCE*E and RHCE*e genotype incompatibility in a southern Thai Muslim population and to compare it with those previously reported for other populations. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Nine hundred and twenty-seven DNA samples obtained from 427 unrelated healthy blood donors from southern Thai Muslims and 500 samples from Central Thais were included. Samples were genotyped for RHCE*E and RHCE*e using an in-house polymerase chain reaction with the sequence-specific primer technique. RESULTS: Significant differences were found when we compared the allele frequencies of the RHCE*E and RHCE*e between southern Thai Muslims and Central Thais: RHCE*E 0.162 versus 0.197 and RHCE*e 0.838 versus 0.803 and also found in Chinese, American native, Japanese, Korean, Alaskan native, Hawaiian, South Asian, Brazilian Japanese-descendant, and Malay Malaysian populations (P < 0.05). In addition, the E/e incompatibilities among southern Thai Muslims and Central Thais were 24.23% and 26.71%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study was the first to determine the RHCE*E and RHCE*e genotype incompatibility among southern Thai Muslims, enabling the estimation of their potential alloimmunization risk. These data could be useful to provide safe blood transfusions across ethnic populations.


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2006 - Asian Journal of Transfusion Science | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
Online since 10th November, 2006