Asian Journal of Transfusion Science

LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year
: 2016  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 166--168

Knowledge and awareness among nurses regarding the blood transfusion services and practices in a tertiary care teaching hospital


Shweta Talati1, Anil Kumar Gupta1, Ashish Jain2,  
1 Department of Hospital Administration, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh - 160 012, India
2 Department of Transfusion Medicine, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh - 160 012, India

Correspondence Address:
Ashish Jain
Department of Transfusion Medicine, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh - 160 012
India




How to cite this article:
Talati S, Gupta AK, Jain A. Knowledge and awareness among nurses regarding the blood transfusion services and practices in a tertiary care teaching hospital.Asian J Transfus Sci 2016;10:166-168


How to cite this URL:
Talati S, Gupta AK, Jain A. Knowledge and awareness among nurses regarding the blood transfusion services and practices in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Asian J Transfus Sci [serial online] 2016 [cited 2022 Oct 2 ];10:166-168
Available from: https://www.ajts.org/text.asp?2016/10/2/166/177205


Full Text

Sir,

The cumulative analysis of the United Kingdom (UK) Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) report reveals that overall the most common adverse incidents are caused by errors, resulting in the transfusion of an incorrect component or one that does not meet the specific requirements of the patient.[1] Nurses play a significant role in correct, scientific, and safe usage of blood and its components and if they can do it correctly, the probability of incidence of blood transfusion risks will be reduced to a minimum.[2]

We performed a cross sectional study at our tertiary care teaching hospital to determine the knowledge and awareness level of nurses regarding blood transfusion services and practices using a questionnaire containing 20 multiple-choice questions and recorded the correct responses. We randomly selected 100 nurses (50 Grade-I and 50 Grade-II nurses) from medical and surgical wards, intensive care units (ICUs), operation theatres, and Emergency areas of the hospital. In our setup, the Grade-I nurses who are senior to the Grade-II nurses, perform bedside patient care activities as well as administrative tasks. The questionnaire used was designed after referring to a study by Mitra et al.[3] and was divided into five categories [Table 1]. The knowledge and awareness of the nurses was not compared area wise in the study. The statistical analysis was done using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (version 15.0, Chicago, USA).{Table 1}

The correct response rates [Table 1] and [Table 2] of “Awareness related” questions were highest among both Grade-I (70%) and Grade-II (70.7%) nurses. The overall mean correct response rate for all the 20 questions taken together was 60.7% [Table 2]. No statistically significant difference in correct response rate was observed in all the question categories [Table 2] except for the “storage related” question category (P = 0.013) among Grade-I and Grade-II nurses.{Table 2}

Aslani et al.,[4] in their study, showed that 18.8% of nurses gave a correct response for “optimum time between the issue of blood/blood components and their transfusion” that is similar to our study (19%). Bayraktar et al.[5] measured the nurses' knowledge and practice related to blood transfusions where only a few had scores higher than 50 out of 100. The statistically significant correct responses by Grade-II nurses rather than the Grade-I nurses for “storage related” questions probably reflects that the Grade-II nurses are more involved in handling the blood components for bedside transfusions. We suggest that on-the-job training and education sessions focused toward pretransfusion checks and bedside practices may help further improving the nurses' knowledge.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1Bolton-Maggs PH, Cohen H. Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) haemovigilance and progress is improving transfusion safety. Br J Haematol 2013;163:303-14.
2Saillour-Glénisson F, Tricaud S, Mathoulin-Pélissier S, Bouchon B, Galpérine I, Fialon P, et al. Factors associated with nurses' poor knowledge and practice of transfusion safety procedures in Aquitaine, France. Int J Qual Health Care 2002;14: 25-32.
3Mitra K, Mandal PK, Nandy S, Roy R, Joardar GK, Mishra R. A study on awareness and perceptions regarding blood safety and blood donation among health care providers in a teaching hospital in Calcutta. Indian J Community Med 2001; 26:21-5.
4Aslani Y, Etemadyfar S, Noryan K. Nurses' knowledge of blood transfusion in medical traning centers of Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences in 2004. Iran J Nurs Midwifery Res 2010;15:141-4.
5Bayraktar N, Erdil F. Blood transfusion knowledge and practice among nurses in Turkey. J Intraven Nurs 2000;23: 310-7.