Asian Journal of Transfusion Science
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   2007| July-December  | Volume 1 | Issue 2  
 
 
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ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Red cell hemolysis during processing and storage
RB Sawant, SK Jathar, SB Rajadhyaksha, PT Kadam
July-December 2007, 1(2):47-51
DOI:10.4103/0973-6247.33446  PMID:21938232
Introduction: Apart from the visual assessment, measurement of plasma hemoglobin in the supernatant from red cell units provides an objective measure of the extent of hemolysis during storage. Study Design and Methods: Packed red cells (N=50), 25 units each in triple (CPD-A1 and SAGM) and quadruple (CPD-A1 and ADSOL) blood bags were evaluated for plasma hemoglobin by the tetramethylbenzidiene (TMB) method on day 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 of collection. The hemoglobin, hematocrit, MCV, LDH and potassium levels were also noted. Whole blood units (N=25) were used as controls. Results: Hemolysis increased in all the stored red cell units. Plasma hemoglobin increased significantly in the first week of storage. The hemolysis, LDH and potassium levels were found to be significantly higher in the red cell units harvested from the triple blood bags. However, on day 28 of storage, free hemoglobin in all the red cell units was much below the 0.8% hemolysis. Conclusion: Hemolysis of the red cells increases due to processing and during storage and is maximum during the first week. Adequate process control and proper storage facilities should be ensured to minimize the hemolysis of red cells during processing and storage.
  35 20,523 1,709
REVIEW ARTICLES
Hepatitis B virus S gene escape mutants
Michael A Purdy
July-December 2007, 1(2):62-70
DOI:10.4103/0973-6247.33445  PMID:21938236
Hepatitis B virus (HBV) can be classified into nine immunological subtypes or eight genotypes. The most prevalent genotypes in Asia are genotypes B and C. HBV is transmitted parenteraly and can produce either asymptomatic or symptomatic disease. Although the consequences of acute hepatitis B can be severe, serious sequelae are associated with chronic infections. HBV seroprevalence ranges from intermediate (2%-7%) to high (≥8%) levels in Asia. Several strategies for the control and prevention of HBV infection have been found to be efficacious. They include vaccination and the administration of HBIG, interferon-a and nucleoside/nucleotide analogues. However, these procedures also apply selective pressures on HBV in infected individuals leading to the generation and accumulation of mutations in the S gene. Most of these mutations occur in the major hydrophilic region (MHR) of the S gene. These mutations create public health concerns as they can be responsible for reactivation of hepatitis B and occult hepatitis B infection. The inability to detect occult infections means that these individuals may become blood donors. This suggests that new strategies for donor evaluation and selection may need to be developed to protect the blood supply.
  29 19,908 1,128
Storage of hemopoietic stem cells
Derwood Pamphilon, Aleksandar Mijovic
July-December 2007, 1(2):71-76
DOI:10.4103/0973-6247.33848  PMID:21938237
Background: Autologous, and in some cases allogeneic, hemopoietic stem cells (HSC) are stored for varying periods of time prior to infusion. For periods of greater than 48 h, storage requires cryopreservation. It is essential to optimize cell storage and ensure the quality of the product for subsequent reinfusion. Methods: A number of important variables may affect the subsequent quality of infused HSC and therapeutic cells (TC). This review discusses these and also reviews the regulatory framework that now aims to ensure the quality of stem cells and TC for transplantation. Results: Important variables included cell concentration, temperature, interval from collection to cryopreservation, manipulations performed. They also included rate of freezing and whether controlled-rate freezing was employed. Parameters studied were type of cryoprotectant utilized [dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) is most commonly used, sometimes in combination with hydroxyethyl starch (HES)]; and storage conditions. It is also important to assess the quality of stored stem cells. Measurements employed included the total cell count (TNC), mononuclear cell count (MNC), CD34+ cells and colony-forming units - granulocyte macrophage (CFU-GM). Of these, TNC and CD34+ are the most useful. However, the best measure of the quality of stored stem cells is their subsequent engraftment. The quality systems used in stem cell laboratories are described in the guidance of the Joint Accreditation Committee of ISCT (Europe) and the EBMT (JACIE) and the EU Directive on Tissues and Cells plus its supporting commission directives. Inspections of facilities are carried out by the appropriate national agencies and JACIE. Conclusion: For high-quality storage of HSC and TC, processing facilities should use validated procedures that take into account critical variables. The quality of all products must be assessed before and after storage.
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ORIGINAL ARTICLES
A prospective audit of transfusion requests in a tertiary care hospital for the use of fresh frozen plasma
RN Makroo, V Raina, P Kumar, UK Thakur
July-December 2007, 1(2):59-61
DOI:10.4103/0973-6247.33847  PMID:21938235
Aims and Background: Like any other drug, therapeutic use of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) has its own side effects, adverse reactions and risks involved. Overall use of FFP has been on the increase in most tertiary care hospitals. Since the guidelines for FFP use in a clinical setting are not well defined, the present study aims at defining the appropriateness of use of FFP in the light of its risks and benefits as a drug. Materials and Methods: We carried out a prospective survey of 821 transfusion orders for 2,915 units of fresh frozen plasma components in our hospital over a 4-month period and recorded indication for transfusion and the number of components requested. Results: Five hundred seventy-three (69.8%) of transfusion requests affecting 2,202 (75.54%) units of FFP were appropriately indicated, while 248 (30.2%) of FFP requests were inappropriately indicated. The majority of fresh frozen plasma requests used were for surgical bleeding (22.77%) because of the deranged coagulation profile before surgery in most of the patients. It was followed by liver disease and transplantation (12.54%). Out of 821 patients, 586 were male and 235 were female. Conclusion: Inappropriate requests accounted for 30.2% of the total FFP requests in patients who had normal coagulation parameters. Regular audits, appropriate training of medical staff, conducting regular CMEs are the measures being incorporated in our hospital to rationalize the use of blood components.
  6 7,331 321
Thrombocytopenia in leptospirosis and role of platelet transfusion
Jayashree Sharma, Moushumi Suryavanshi
July-December 2007, 1(2):52-55
DOI:10.4103/0973-6247.33447  PMID:21938233
Aim : The study was designed to find out the incidence of thrombocytopenia in leptospirosis and to correlate thrombocytopenia with other parameters like renal failure, hepatic failure and bleeding manifestation like adult respiratory distress syndrome and to assess the role of platelet transfusion. Materials and Methods : 50 cases of leptospirosis during the month of July and August 2005 were retrospectively analyzed. Criteria for selection were Lepto Tek Dri - dot test positive cases of the clinically suspected cases of Leptospirosis. Degree of thrombocytopenia was categorized as severe, moderate and mild. Presence of thrombocytopenia was clinically correlated with parameters like renal dysfunction, hepatic dysfunction and hemorrhagic manifestations (mainly ARDS). Role of platelet transfusion was assessed with reference to presence and degree of thrombcytopenia and hemorrhagic manifestations. Results : Out of total 50 patients 26 were male and 24 were females. Major bleeding manifestation in the form of ARDS was seen in 15 (30%) of patients. 28 (56%) patients had thrombocytopenia and 22 (44%) patients had normal platelet counts. Total number of patients with renal dysfunction was 24 (48%). Only four (18.18%) patients with normal platelet counts had renal dysfunction while 20 (71.42%) patients with thrombocytopenia had renal dysfunction. Only two (9.09%) patients with normal platelet counts and 48 (46.42%) patients with thrombocytopenia had hepatorenal dysfunction. Total number of patients with ARDS was 15 (30%). Of these two (13.33%) had normal platelet count while 13 (86.6%) patients were thrombocytopenic. Total 47 units of platelets were transfused to 12 patients in our study. Of these seven patients with severe thrombocytopenia required total 28 units, two patients with moderate thrombocytopenia required total seven units and patients with mild thrombocytopenia were transfused total 12 units of platelets. Conclusion : It is important to anticipate and recognize thrombocytopenia early in the course of leptospirosis so that appropriate steps can be taken to prevent it and to treat it with platelet transfusion when it develops
  5 13,698 1,026
Study of 25 cases of exchange transfusion by reconstituted blood in hemolytic disease of newborn
DC Sharma, Sunita Rai, Aakash Mehra, MM Kaur, Satya Sao, Ajay Gaur, Rahul Sapra
July-December 2007, 1(2):56-58
DOI:10.4103/0973-6247.33448  PMID:21938234
This study was aimed to review and establish the practice of exchange transfusion (ET) with reconstituted blood in neonates and to observe fall of bilirubin and its comparison with related studies. Twenty-five neonates diagnosed as hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) were selected for this study, in which exchange transfusion was carried out as one of the treatments for hyperbilirubinemia. Out of the 25 cases, 15 were of Rhesus (Rh) HDN, while ABO and other blood groups constituted 6 and 4 HDN cases respectively. First, the neonates' and mother's blood samples were subjected to relevant investigations. After that, for neonates having Rh HDN, O Rh negative cells suspended in AB plasma were given, O Rh positive cells suspended in AB plasma were given to ABO HDN; and O positive cells, which were indirect Coomb's cross-matched compatible with neonates' and mother's serum / plasma, suspended in AB plasma were given to the neonates having HDN because of other blood group antibodies. The exchange transfusion (ET) was carried out taking all aseptic precautions by Push-Pull technique with double-volume exchange transfusion method. The average post-exchange fall in serum indirect bilirubin was (52.01%) in all 25 cases, which was found to be more significant than the previous studies. Looking into the superiority of the exchange transfusion in HDN by reconstituted blood, the reconstituted blood can be modified and supplied as per the requirement and conditions.
  4 42,287 1,516
ABSTRACTS
XXXI National Conference of Indian Society of Blood Transfusion and Immunohematology (ISBTI), Ahmedabad, India
ISBTI Group
July-December 2007, 1(2):82-105
Full text not available  [PDF]
  - 1,126 104
CONFERENCE REPORT
An immunohematological 'Wet' workshop
Graeme D Woodfield, Jim Perkins, Susan T Johnson
July-December 2007, 1(2):77-80
PMID:21938238
A practical workshop on 'Immunohematology' was conducted in conjunction with the Indian Society of Blood Transfusion and Immunohaematology annual scientific program. The participants, from many parts of India, were able to obtain valuable practice in key areas of blood group serology and by the end of the workshop were able to carry out 'tube' techniques for antibody detection and identification. Column agglutination methods were also demonstrated. A preliminary questionnaire was completed by participants. Results showed a wide variety in types of pretransfusion (serologic) testing being performed. Less than half of the participants had encountered hemolytic transfusion reactions. The program was rated as excellent by most participants in response to a postworkshop evaluation questionnaire, with requests for longer and more frequent workshops. Safety of blood for transfusion depends on maintenance of high standards of both microbiological and immunohematological performance by the blood bank staff.
  - 4,694 286
GUEST EDITORIAL
Current status of transfusion services
JG JoIIy
July-December 2007, 1(2):45-46
DOI:10.4103/0973-6247.33846  PMID:21938231
  - 4,127 299
OBITUARY
Obituary
YS Iyer
July-December 2007, 1(2):81-81
  - 2,844 188
Obituary
Deelip Wani
July-December 2007, 1(2):81-81
  - 2,413 125
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2006 - Asian Journal of Transfusion Science | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
Online since 10th November, 2006